Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Tile Tips for an Eye-Catching Backsplash


This post is a contribution to the Range Hoods Inc July Blog Hop & $50 Amazon Gift Card Giveaway. As a blog hop participant, we've been asked to write about Summer DIY & Home Improvement. Check out the link to read other DIY contributions, learn more about the blog hop, and a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card.

A kitchen backsplash is one place you’ll be looking at a lot while you enjoy your home. It’s also one place that allows you to really emphasize your style. Creating an eye-catching backsplash that reflects your style and taste is easy with tile.

Patchwork designs create an eye-catching backsplash.
Patchwork designs create an eye-catching backsplash but take planning to achieve a balanced blend of color and pattern.

The choices and options are endless and range from a traditional fruit-themed mural, multi-colored mosaic, colorful Spanish tile patterns, or a muted bold pattern with cement tile. Consider the style and color palette of your cabinets, flooring, appliances and range hood. Then follow these three important tips that will point you in the right direction to create a winning kitchen backsplash. Don’t be afraid to splurge a little on the backsplash. It’s a small area and one you’ll enjoy almost every day!

  1. Decide on the countertop you want first. Then you can start talking tile and backsplash designs. Make sure the two complement each other. Don't draw attention away from a stunning counter with a busy tiled background. If the countertop is plain or simple, then let the backsplash be the focal point. Here are a few photos that show the "yen and yang" relationship of a counter and backsplash.  In the patchwork above, bold colors and strong patterns are placed next to clean white cabinets and counters with stainless steel appliances and hardware. The backsplash is both eye-catching and appealing because the cement tile patchwork is the dominant focal point.

    Here’s another example of a bold, colorful backsplash that uses traditional hand-painted Spanish decorative ceramic tiles that really catch your eye. A plain counter, in a similar color that is dominant in the tile pattern, doesn’t take your attention away from the backsplash.

    Balance decorative pattern tiles in a backsplash with plain colors on the counter and floor.
    Above, a Spanish-inspired tile creates a bright and bold backsplash using Barcelona San Jose 6" x 6".  The tile pairs nicely with a simple solid-color counter.

    Alternatively, the pattern in the cement tile backsplash below gets your attention while integrating a bold pattern that works flawlessly with the counter. Bold patterns can often be “toned down” with similar colors, neutral colors or colors without high contrast.

    A bold cement tile pattern is muted with neutral colors and hues similar to the counter and cabinets.

    Below, the Indian Teal brown granite countertop takes center stage. The decorative dots of hand-painted Spanish tile and plain field tile are the supporting cast.

    Small decorative accent tile or dots keep the backsplash interesting and don't detract from the handsome counter.

    The French cement tile backsplash pattern behind the stove below was customized to complement the colors in the granite counter and floor.  The backsplash tiles provide the eye-catching focal point; but, the porcelain flooring and granite counter really support the overall color palette, style and feel of the design.

    Consistent color choice with the decorative tile, counter, and floor make this design work.


  2. Work with the available space. You can't fit 10 pounds of gold into a 5-pound sack. Large tiles with big patterns just don't work in that tiny wall space behind the sink with a big picture window - no matter how much you love that tile. It sounds obvious; but pictures make it very clear.

    Find the right scale of patterned tile to fit your space.

    Above, Cuban Heritage Design 110 2B 8″ x 8″ cement tiles require eight tiles to complete both the cross and medallion pattern. It works well for a large wall with no cabinets. The same impact could not be achieved below. There is only 18” between the cabinets and counter. However, decorative tile placed randomly throughout the backsplash and grouped to form a medallion create a warm, Tuscan feel.

    Olive tiles on a rustic ceramic body give this kitchen a Tuscan feel.
    Smaller tiles can be used randomly or grouped to create a medallion.

    Consider creating a mural with smaller, decorative tiles and frame with a lavish, textured molding if you don't have space for large pattern tiles.

    A framed tile murals below the range-hood accommodates the space perfectly.


  3. Define your style. A kitchen designer can really help. First, though, try to define the experience you want to achieve, the importance of aesthetics versus “ease of maintenance.” What colors do you like? Do you like clean lines and contemporary designs or classic patterns? Bright colors or muted colors? Vivid colors or earth tones? Here's a few examples of classic and contemporary styles that use tiles to define the design.

    Fruit, vegetable and flowers are a classic kitchen theme for a kitchen backsplash.
    Fruit, vegetable and flowers are a classic kitchen theme for a kitchen backsplash.

    Traditional cement tile patterns in hip colors work with this updated contemporary kitchen.
    Traditional cement tile patterns in hip colors work with this updated contemporary kitchen.

    If too much pattern scares you, consider "blocking tiles" to create one or two interest areas.

    Consider using Pinterest to collect ideas you like. Not only will you discover a theme that works, you’ll also be able to share your vision with your designer or friend who is helping with the design.


As you find your style and look for tile, keep these three rules in mind and you will end up with an eye-catching backsplash that you’ll love for years to come.  Don't miss the other posts that are part of Range Hoods Inc July Blog Hop & $50 Amazon Gift Card Giveaway.


Here's links to the other Blog Hop posts:

  1. July Blog Hop Post #1: 5 Elements of an Artful Kitchen by Artful Kitchens
  2. July Blog Hop Post #2: Budget Outdoor Décor Hacks… By Snazzy Little Things


What are you waiting for?  Get your chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card!

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Tile and Spanish Colonial Revival Architecture at the Homestead Museum


The hot, humid weather we've been experiencing in Southern California since last week has taken a toll on me. I am not used to the tropical weather, so I find my mind wandering.

The entry gates to La Casa Nueva at the Homestead Museum
The entry gates to La Casa Nueva at the Homestead Museum

However, with the stifling and oppressive heat, there is great news! We received some much-needed rain for our parched California lands. Also, as my mind continues to wander, I couldn't help but think of a getaway or vacation, so I thought I would share one of my favorite tile haunts here in California, The Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum.

The Moorish-inspired, Spanish door and entry of La Casa Nueva is meant to impress.

The Homestead Museum is a hidden gem that resides in the most unlikely of areas, the City of Industry, just outside of Los Angeles. The museum is a place to explore the history of the Los Angeles region from 1830 to 1930 through the hopes and dashed aspirations of two families. The six-acre site features the Workman House, an 1870s country home constructed around an 1840s adobe built by William and Nicolasa Workman.

Additionally, La Casa Nueva, a 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival mansion noted for its architectural crafts, was built by the Workmans' grandson Walter Temple and his wife, Laura. Additionally, El Campo Santo, one of the region's oldest private cemeteries, contains the remains of Pío Pico (the last governor of Mexican California), and other prominent pioneer families. Being a huge fan of Spanish and Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, I'll share some of the highlights of La Casa Nueva or the New House.

The main entry with its central, open plan is impressive and filled with hand-crafted details like carved vegas, wood floors, and tiled stair risers.

La Casa Nueva is filled with bespoke details of Spanish Colonial Revival Architecture
The main entry is filled with bespoke details of Spanish colonial revival architecture.


A grand staircase with Spanish tile and tile floor molding in La Casa Nueva
A grand staircase with Spanish tile and tile floor molding in La Casa Nueva.

As you discover the grounds, with your guide, you'll also find some unique rooms like this barbershop embellished with cement tiles. Cement tile such as this remind me of Cuban tile barbershops found in Havana during the same time period.

Cement tile in the Barber Shop reminds me of Cuban Tile
Cement tile in the Barber Shop reminds me of handmade Cuban Heritage tile.

A close-up detailing the cement tile pattern found in the Barber Shop
A close-up detailing the cement tile pattern found in the Barber Shop.

I'll continue with this amazing tour of La Casa Nueva in August. It's a feast of design details and tile - everywhere you go.

Feeling inspired? Want to learn more about how to use tile that create the style and feel of Spanish and Spanish Colonial Revival architecture? This is one of our passions and we can help. Visit our Spanish Tile Design Center today!



Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Cement Tile Patterns for Patios and Floors


Cement tile floors for outdoor patios or indoor living spaces allow you to create unparalleled visual appeal using patterns together with the colors of your choice. Here are a few recent projects that I've been working on with customers. Each project shows how cement tile is being used to create flooring that is both personal and unique.

Celebrate summer and be reminded of the cool water at the seashore with the Wave pattern by Tania Marmolejo from our Artist Series.

Cement tile floor pattern using Wave in Stormy Blue and White
Cement tile floor pattern using Wave in Stormy Blue and White
Desiring a casual look for their floor, one of our Southern California customers chose the hip, contemporary and stylistic Wave pattern. Selecting their own colors, Stormy Blue and White from the Heritage Palette, they customized the pattern for their design at no additional cost. Durable and easy-to-maintain, cement tile is a great choice for floors. Not only is the look cool, casual and comfortable; but, the silky feel of polished cement tile on bare feet is a perfect choice for an outdoor patio or bathroom. The larger 10" x 10" cement tile format laid from wall to wall without a border. provides eye-catching appeal for contemporary homes.


Capitalizing on California's great year-round weather, many of the state's homes wrap around a backyard patio that can be accessed from the bedroom, kitchen and living areas. A customer in Santa Monica has a traditional Spanish-style home with a central back patio. She wanted to tile the back patio and establish a casual, contemporary look that would work with the home's traditional architecture. She achieved her vision by using the Union 1A pattern by Tania Marmolejo, also from our Artist Series.  

Union 1A pattern from Avente's Artist Series of Cement Tile
Union 1A pattern from Avente's Artist Series of Cement Tile

To achieve a slightly more traditional feel for this outdoor patio, the pattern was framed to make a rug using Ash Grey. The area outside the rug will be filled with Dark Shadow. Both Ash Grey and Dark Shadow are colors from within the pattern. The interlocking circle pattern plays well with the classic Moorish-inspired, Spanish theme of the home's architecture. The soft and dark grey color palette is easy to work with and complements the existing design.

Another Avente customer wanted to maintain a traditional, slightly more formal look for their entry hall. Working with patterns and colors from our Mission cement tile collection, they created a complex tile rug pattern with a border. However, since the rug will be laid in a polished, cut, poured concrete slab, only two colors from the grey-scale were used.

New Castle pattern with Queen Border in Charcoal and Grey
Cement tile rug created using New Castle pattern with Queen Border in Charcoal and Grey

Moreover, our same customer also liked our Cuban Heritage CH110-2B and choose the pattern for a different area of their home. The popular CH110-2B Cuban Heritage cement tile pattern uses shades of blues, grays, and dark brown. Unfortunately, the customer didn't have any blue in their existing design, so they changed the pattern colors and substituted Cana Green for Royal blue in the pattern.

Cuban Heritage Design 110-2B Cement Tile. Cana Green has been substituted for Royal Blue

As you can see, designing with cement tile is fun and personable. I can't wait to see the installation photos from these customers after their tile is delivered and installed. These recent projects from our customers illustrate how flexible cement tile is with any decor or environment. You can create flooring designs for outdoor spaces, such as patios and walks, or interior spaces such as entries and kitchen floors. Cement tile works with the existing architectural elements from traditional to contemporary. You can use our existing designs and colors in the catalog, modify the colors in the pattern, or mix or match patterns and borders to make your home your castle. The choice is yours!

Feeling inspired? Want to learn more about cement tile design, cement tile flooring, cement tile patterns, and see installations? Let us help! Visit our Cement Tile Information Center.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Malibu with Terracotta Ceramic Tiles: A Historical Perspective

Stunning view of the Malibu coast from the historic Adamson House.
Stunning view of the Malibu coast from the historic Adamson House.

Situated in one of the most sought after coastal locations on the West Coast in Southern California, and perhaps the nation, is the Adamson House. Now a museum, the Adamson House occupies land that was previously home to the Chumash Indians until the 18th century. Later, according to Malibu Adamson House Foundation (MAHF) records, “the Rindge family owned 17,000 acres and 20 miles of coastline.” With the coast on one side and the Santa Monica mountains on the other, “the Rindge family’s daughter, Rhoda, and her husband, Merritt Huntley Adamson, used the site to construct a beach house, now the historic Adamson House museum.

A closer look at the blue-glazed Malibu with terracotta tiles at the Adamson House.
A closer look at the blue-glazed Malibu with terracotta tiles at the Adamson House.

Moreover, the Spanish Colonial Revival style home, built in 1929, enjoys the designation of being a National Historic Site, California Historical Landmark, and a California State Park. “Situated near the Malibu Pier between popular Surfrider Beach and the Malibu Lagoon, the house boasts an exotic mix of Spanish and Moorish influences with dazzling displays of decorative tiles and one-of-a-kind craftsmanship including hand-carved doors, hand-painted frescoes, molded ceilings, distinctive cast ironwork and lead-framed bottle glass windows,” the museum added.


Malibu glazed ceramic tiles meld beautifully with terracotta tiles along the walkways of the Adamson House.
Malibu glazed ceramic tiles meld beautifully with terracotta tiles along the walkways of the Adamson House. 

Interestingly, California was inundated with tile-producing companies in the 1920s, including Malibu Potteries, the company founded by May Rindge. “Filled with an entrepreneurial spirit, May Rindge started the firm after discovering her land was rich in the natural resources needed to manufacture ceramic tile. She wisely hired Rufus Keeler—a ceramist and draftsman whom many considered a ceramic genius for his secret glazes known for their color and clarity—as her plant manager,” according to the MAHF.

Thankfully, the tradition of creating colorful, decorative and long-lasting tiles similar to those found in the Adamson House remain strong with our latest introduction, Malibu with Terracotta Ceramic Tile.

Vibrant colors coupled with Spanish- and Moorish-inspired patterns make our Malibu with Terracotta Ceramic Tile collection a feast for the eyes.
Vibrant colors coupled with Spanish- and Moorish-inspired patterns make our Malibu with Terracotta Ceramic Tile collection a feast for the eyes.

This line of hand-painted ceramic tile pays homage to the Malibu and Catalina Potteries of California of the 1920s. Using classic patterns, these tiles are created using the cuerda seca technique to produce a slight relief and outline around each pattern color where the glazes pool. These tiles differ from our decorative ceramic Malibu tile line because the design utilizes unglazed terracotta or bisque for the background for a traditional Spanish look. Mix and match plain field tile colors from our Malibu Field to create harmonizing designs. The Malibu with Terracotta Ceramic Tile collection is suitable for all indoor applications, including walls and floors. They are also suitable for outdoor locations in frosty environments.





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What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness? ~ John Steinbeck

With school out for the summer, and our dreams of upcoming summer adventures coming to fruition, we chose the Pinterest board that best reflects this exuberance – Summer Food and Fun!

Summer’s energy translates to taking on new projects, perhaps one that has been set aside for years. Replacing cracked or broken pool tile or finally installing that fountain or water feature you’ve always wanted for the garden, and perhaps adding Malibu Ceramic Tiles with Terracotta to an indoor or outdoor set of stair rises.

Using handmade or hand-painted porcelain tile for your next outdoor or indoor project will not only enhance the look of your home, but you can rest assured the tile you choose will withstand the elements, too. For whichever project you choose to conquer, Avente Tile is here to help you reach your design goal. Our extensive ceramic tile Design Idea gallery features a large collection of projects dedicated to inspiring you and your living space. How can we help inspire you today?

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Adamson House Tile Tour

With the Fourth of July Holiday just around the corner, I found my thoughts wandering toward the sunny California coast. So, I thought I'd share one of my favorite historical tile haunts, The Adamson House. It's located right on the Pacific Ocean and steps from the Malibu Pier in Malibu, California. Even if you aren't interested in tile and California history, it's hard to find a reason not to visit this lovely location.

Located in Malibu, California, the grounds of the Adamson house make for an enjoyable summer destination
Located right on the coast in stunning Malibu, the grounds of the Adamson house make for an enjoyable summer destination.

The grounds alone are simply stunning and open to the public every day during daylight. The Adamson house is a Spanish Colonial Revival home that was built in 1929. It has a unique mix of Spanish and Moorish architecture styles and perhaps one of the most comprehensive collections of tiles from the day. Famed Malibu Tile was manufactured just steps from there. As the trophy home of the factory owners, the home is nothing short of a showpiece. The factory produced tiles that are still coveted today and can be be found in some of Los Angeles' architectural treasures, such as the Mayan Theater and City Hall.

Glazed terracotta planters with ornate designs are clues to what await.
Glazed terracotta planters with ornate designs are clues to what await.

Today, we'll explore only the outside grounds. But, stay tuned for next week's post where we'll show more details and provide a bit of history on this tile treasure trove.

The flagstone entry pulls the eye to the resplendent tile entry  of the Adamson house
The flagstone entry pulls the eye to the resplendent tile entry

Adamson House tiled entry is a tile tapestry
The entry to the Adamson House tiled is a tile tapestry

An exquisite peacock tile tapestry faces the back patio
An exquisite peacock tile tapestry water feature faces the back patio 

Moorish-inspired details like this parabolic window are adorned with glazed ceramic tile patterns
Moorish-inspired details such as this parabolic window are adorned with glazed ceramic tile patterns


Tiled outdoor tubs were used for washing pets - in style!
Tiled outdoor tubs were used for washing pets - in style!

Did you enjoy today's post? Then you might want to subscribe to Avente Tile's mailing list for free! Subscribers receive our hand-painted ceramic and cement tile newsletter, Tile Talk, once per month.

Tile Talk offers great hand-painted ceramic and cement tile design ideas, tile tips, and information about new ceramic and cement tile products. We also explore historically significant tile installations, such as today's post, as well as photos of hand-painted ceramic and cement tile installations and designs, and perspectives from designers and architects who have specified and installed beautiful hand-painted ceramic and cement tiles. We think you'll find lots of inspiration!


Next week's newsletter will provide a historical perspective on Malibu tile and more information about this endearing historical landmark. Sign-up now for your free copy of Tile Talk!

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Favorite Tiled Walks That Add Style


With the Summer Solstice now behind us, it's time to celebrate this much-anticipated season by enjoying the outdoors. I enjoy taking my daily neighborhood walks early in the day. It's during these walks that I stop to admire the tiled walks and entries. In this post, I'll be sharing some of my favorites that not only add to a home's uniqueness, but those that also provide welcoming curb appeal.

Rustic Pavers in Mission Red create a charming tiled walk for this home

It's easy to see why a tiled cement sidewalk offers so much more style than a typical grey, poured sidewalk. Colorful tiled walks provide a bright, eye-catching entry to a home. Red is a great choice for Mediterranean, Spanish, Spanish Colonial, Spanish Revival, and Adobe style homes. If you have a large landing or patio, then consider adding a medallion or patterned stair riser tiles.

Further, the exquisite beauty of hand-poured cement tile in plain colors is unmatched. You can see the hand of the tile artisan in the installation with the variation in color and shade from tile to tile. The floor or sidewalk almost shimmers like a gem, especially in full light. Look at the Heritage Indian Red walk below and you'll see what I mean. The tiled stair risers catch your attention, while the plain red walk causes you to linger and pause.


Plain cement tile, Heritage Indian Red, makes for a bright and eye-catching entrance.
Plain cement tile, Heritage Indian Red, makes for a bright and eye-catching entrance. A medallion using Traditional Alcala corner pieces adds interest and brings attention to the stair riser pattern 

Square Rustic Cement TIle Pavers in Cotto Dark laid in a running bond pattern create a fresh look
Square concrete tiles, Rustic Pavers in Cotto Dark, are laid in a running bond pattern to create a fresh look

Use our Rustic Pavers, laid on a wide grout line to accommodate their irregular shape, to create Old World elegance. If you want to replicated an antique look use Cotto Dark; Cotto Gold looks like traditional Spanish bisque. Or use a blend of the two, Spanish Cotto, to create lots of charm and interest with the color variation. Additionally, our Rustic Pavers color palette includes the tones found in Mexican pavers or Saltillo tile. So, you can even replicate the look of Saltillo, too.



This long entry path is made interesting by using Arabesque Octagon and Dot Rustic Pavers in Cotto Dark
This long entry path is made interesting by using Arabesque Octagon Rustic pavers in Cotto Dark. 

DESIGN TIP: When using shapes that are not rectangular or square, like hexagons and octagons, make sure to frame the edge of each side of the path with a rectangular tile.


Rustic pavers, shown here in Buff, look like Saltillo tile but will wear better.
Rustic pavers, shown here in Buff, look like Saltillo tile but will wear better.


DESIGN TIP: Create the look of Saltillo tile or Mexican pavers with cement tile. It's more durable, requires less care and is available in more sizes, shapes and trim.


Malibu deco tiles on the stair risers with Rustic Pavers in Mission Red for the treads.
Malibu deco tiles on the stair risers with Rustic Pavers in Mission Red for the treads.

DESIGN TIP: When laying tile on paths that are not square or do not run perpendicular, consider laying them "on point" to avoid mismatched grout lines, or you can use different sizes of tile.

Whether you're recreating the rustic elegance of Old World Spanish bisque or Saltillo tiles, looking for unique formats, or the exquisite beauty of hand-poured plain cement tile, we have a tile that works with your design aesthetic, color palette, and space. Are you looking for Spanish Colonial, Spanish Revival, Moorish-inspired designs, or something slightly more contemporary? No worries. We can help you create a look for a tile walk that is extraordinary, unique and in keeping with a home's architectural style.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

5 Steps to Successfully Applying Penetrating Sealer to Cement Tile


Sealers for cement tile should be applied to protect the tile from water and staining; but, they can also be used to enhance or restore color. A color-enhancing sealer was used on this exterior cement tile walk, stair risers, and treads to protect them and brighten the colors.

Color enhancing impregnating sealers are used to brighten cement tile color
Color-enhancing impregnating sealers are used to brighten cement tile colors,
especially exterior tiles subject to fading from the sun.

Sealers remain one of the most misunderstood and confusing steps of installing cement tile. The confusion comes from the different types of sealers (impregnating, topical, color enhancing), the nomenclature used (impregnating is the same as penetrating), and the dizzying number of manufacturers and specialized products offered.

With so many sealer options available, including finishing effects (gloss, satin, matte) and applications (outside sidewalk, inside bath, or pool sideboard), you are sure to get a different procedure from different people each time you ask. So, it's easy to understand why people get confused. It doesn't have to be confusing though. The goal of today's post and short video is to demystify the use of sealers when it comes to installing cement tile,

Step #1. Select a high-quality penetrating or impregnating sealer. You may use either a water-based or solvent-based sealer. Water-based sealers are slightly easier to apply and may provide better coverage protection because they aren't as deeply absorbed into the tile. Solvent-based sealers have a strong odor when applied and may provide longer protection, especially against water. I explain this thoroughly in a previous post, Sealing Cement Tile.

When selecting a sealer, make sure it's rated for where you are using the tile. Specifically ask if the sealer can be used for:
  1. Indoor or outdoor applications
  2. Floor or wall applications
  3. Wet locations (pool or bath) or dry location (bedroom)
Step #2. Select a topical sealer if you want to provide additional finish effects to the tile. Penetrating sealers usually do not effect the finish of the tile because they work by impregnating the tile below the surface. Topical sealers create a barrier on the surface of the tile so that stains do not reach the cement. Topical sealers have different finishes that include shiny, satin and matte. Often, matte topical sealers are produced by adding a chemical that cuts the shine, but also weakens the sealer. Topical sealers are not generally recommended for exterior applications as radiant energy from the sun deteriorates them quickly. Topical sealers will wear over time and generally need to be reapplied more frequently that penetrating sealers.

Color-enhancing penetrating sealers can be used to enhance (brighten or darken) the colors of the cement tile. This is a good choice for exterior applications that are subject to fading from the sun.

Step #3. Test your sealer/sealer combination. Always test the final choice of your sealer or sealer combination. Simply apply to a test tile and make sure the desired finish is achieved without any adverse reactions.

Step #4. Clean the area to be sealed. Make sure the tiles to be sealed have been cleaned, all grout has been removed and the tiles are thoroughly dry. Start with a physical cleaning with a blower or broom. Then clean with a tile cleaner or mild detergent and rinse with water and a grout sponge. If the tile looks hazy or cloudy, clean again.

Step #5. Apply the sealer. Use a lamb's wool applicator, lint-free rag or paint brush. Generally, you'll want to apply three coats allowing the sealer to dry between each application. Make sure to apply generously; but, do not allow the sealer to pool, streak, or run.

Tile immediately after applying a color enhancing sealer. No pools or streaks in the sheen.
Tile immediately after applying a color-enhancing sealer. As you can see, there are no pools of sealer or streaks in the sheen.

Cement Tile Crazing
Cement tile often exhibit "crazing" or fine, hairline cracks over time. This is not a defect and does represent any problem with the tile; however, it will be more apparent when the tiles are wet or when applying a sealer. The small cracks or branches show more on dark tiles and plain tiles. Don't panic or think you've done something wrong if you see this after applying a sealer or if the tiles get wet.

Cement tile crazing can be seen in the plain red stair tread
Cement tile crazing can be seen in the plain red stair tread.


Small fissures or crazing is more apparent on dark colors and when the tile is wet
Small fissures, or crazing, are more apparent on dark colors and when the tile is wet.

How to Apply a Penetrating Sealer to Cement Tile Video
This short video shows how to apply a penetrating sealer to unsealed and previously sealed cement tiles. This important part of the installation process protects cement tile from water and staining. I show how easy it is to apply a color-enhancing impregnating or penetrating sealer to a tile walk and patio. I also recommend products to use and where to get them. You can see for yourself, just how easy it is to apply a sealer.



These five simple steps will ensure success for every cement tile project you do. If you aren't sure about which sealer to choose or if you should apply a grout release. We can help! These handy guides will give you all the information you need to know!